ipod_disabledThis seems to be quite a common occurrence, although I have only seen it recently myself for the first time.  It seems bizarre, right?  How can one possibly wait 22 million minutes to try again?  Well, this is somewhat of a glitch in the iOS software.  This is what's happening:

If you have a passcode set on your iDevice, the device will be disabled for a short time if the passcode is entered too many times incorrectly.  This is a security feature, to stop someone from trying passcodes over and over until they finally (maybe) hit the right one.   After entering the passcode incorrectly a number of times, you will have to wait 1 minute before trying again.  Then, maybe 2 minutes the next time.  Then 5 minutes, then an hour and so on.

The reason the message appears which says that your iPhone is disabled try again in 22 million minutes  is because the above mentioned passcode delay has been triggered by someone entering the passcode too many times and the phone has stored a date and time after which you can try to enter more passcodes.  However, before that date and time has been reached, something has caused the iDevice's internal clock to reset to its factory setting.  In this case, January 1st 1970.  If you calculate the number of minutes displayed in terms of years, months, days, hours and minutes, you'll find that it always takes you to the same date.  The factory default date for the iDevice.  January 1st, 1970.  This is the same date that appears when you switch on an iDevice after changing (or disconnecting) the internal battery.  It has no way to remember what date and time it was, so it reverts to its default.

This leaves you in a bit of a mess, because no one wants to wait 40 odd years to be able to re-activate their iDevice.  One way to achieve this is to connect it to the iTunes, but it has to be on the computer that is the "controller" of that iPhone.  That is, the computer that you sync it with.  If you have never synced it, or it was synced with a computer that you don't have access to anymore, you will have to resort to a full restore.  That's fine, except that you will lose all your data.  That means contacts, calendars, photos and videos, SMS messages etc.  Now that can be a bit of a pain and it's a very good reason to always make sure that you back up your iDevice regularly.  To iCloud, or a computer, it doesn't matter - just make sure you do it!

In my next post, I'll be explaining how to go about restoring your iDevice if that's what you need to do.

We have some advanced procedures that are guaranteed to fix this iPhone/iPad disabled problem.  For the quickest and easiest solution, download our PDF guide to restoring your disabled iPhone/iPad now for only $12.95:

You can also contact our Live Support team who can assist you in restoring your iPhone or iPad, however we recommend using our PDF guide first as it's a cheaper and quicker option. If you wish to contact our Live Support team, you can do so by clicking the link below.

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